RV Classifications

Fifth Wheel Trailers

Typical 5th Wheel Trailer


Fifth-wheel trailers are very similar to travel trailers. The big difference between the two is the way they are towed. While travel trailers are towed from a hitch located behind a truck the fifth wheel trailers are towable trailers that hook up directly over the rear bed of a tow vehicle. It has a hitch system very similar to that of a semi-truck. When considering a fifth wheel tow vehicle, you need to realize that about 20% of the trailer weight is on the bed of the truck. They tend to be a little more stable to tow than a travel trailer. They also have more storage than travel trailers but not as much as a motorhome.

Some of the bigger fifth-wheel trailers have 3 axles and weight substantially more than the common travel trailer. Due to the extra weight, you will need something more than a light-duty truck to tow these.

Typical 5th Wheel Trailer
Typical 5th Wheel Toy Hauler. This is a Jayco Seismic Model

They also come in a toy hauler version. The toy hauler version typically has the back of the trailer set up like a garage. It will have anywhere from a 6′ to 12′ foot flat bay with tie-downs to strap in your “toys”. The rear wall will open up and drop down into a ramp so you can remove your motorcycle, golf cart, or whatever other toys you may have. The garage area then converts into a living space with portable furniture or fold down furniture or beds.

Common Hitch Set Up
Although there are many different types of hitches, this is a typical setup

Some toy hauler doors are designed to be used as patio space when not folded up for travel. They have screens to make the inside area like a screen room.

Some people buy toy haulers for the purpose of having a shop area. Instead of toys, they will use this area as a craft, carpentry or any other type of shop they need.

Pros:

More stable to tow than a travel trailer
Most are packed with loads of amenities and extras
More storage than a travel trailer
More living space than most travel trailers
A little easier to set up and break down at campsites 

Cons:

A more heavy-duty truck is needed to tow
You lose the bed of your truck for storage in order to house the hitch
Some models sit high in the front which can cause issues with low bridges and low hanging branches




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